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A growing collection of free walks suitable for all ages, from an hour-long potter to half-day hikes. We have walking tips for those new to rambling and a comment box beneath every walk for your feedback - you may need to disable any ad blocker to add comments.

Walk 60: The Sculpture Trail

Ideal for young and older walkers

An easy 1km loop


Photograph of sculptures along Walk 60 by Hertfordshire Walker released via Creative commons BY-NC-SA 4.0

The Sculpture Trail in Broxbourne Woods is ideal for children and those who are finding long walks and lots of ups and downs too much. It's a gentle walk, with lots to see and plenty of benches for rests. Ideal for the young and old of heart.

Directions


Map for Walk 60: The Sculpture Walk  Created on Map Hub by Hertfordshire Walker  Elements © Thunderforest © OpenStreetMap contributors  Note: There is a larger, more detailed map embedded at the end of these directions
Map for Walk 60: The Sculpture Walk
Created on Map Hub by Hertfordshire Walker
Elements © Thunderforest © OpenStreetMap contributors
Note: There is a larger, more detailed map embedded at the end of these directions
Park in the car park grid reference TL 32754 06923 and go through the arch at the entrance to the Sculpture Trail (see picture above) and follow the trail round to the left for 1km before returning to the starting point. As you walk, look out for the nine sculptures, listed below. The descriptions of the sculptures is taken from the official guide for the walk which is embedded below.

Photograph of sculptures along Walk 60 by Hertfordshire Walker released via Creative commons BY-NC-SA 4.0


1:  Roman Soldier - A life-size Roman soldier standing guard close to Ermine Street, an ancient Roman road built to link London to York.

Photograph of sculptures along Walk 60 by Hertfordshire Walker released via Creative commons BY-NC-SA 4.0


2: Acorn Seat - This seat in the shape of acorns and lobed leaves is carved from local oak. This bold sculpture invites you to sit and connect with the wood from the mighty oak, a tree of power, strength and safety.

Photograph of sculptures along Walk 60 by Hertfordshire Walker released via Creative commons BY-NC-SA 4.0


3: Stag - As you continue look out for the parts of the stag that, when you reach a certain point line up to show the complete sculpture.

Photograph of sculptures along Walk 60 by Hertfordshire Walker released via Creative commons BY-NC-SA 4.0

4: Charcoal Burner - A blackened figure standing alone with his tools. His job was to build and fire a clamp. The clamp was a large carefully piled mound of harvested wood, which was then lit and covered with earth. This was how charcoal was produced from the hornbeam trees still found here.

Photograph of sculptures along Walk 60 by Hertfordshire Walker released via Creative commons BY-NC-SA 4.0


5: Pulley Seat - This curved seat represents one of the uses for hornbeam wood. The hardwearing timber would have been harvested from these woodlands during WW2 to make rifle butts and pulleys.

Photograph of sculptures along Walk 60 by Hertfordshire Walker released via Creative commons BY-NC-SA 4.0


6: Wild Boar - Not as pretty as the domestic pig, these hairy and horned beasts once roamed our woodlands, grubbing around for acorns and other tasty nibbles.The boar would have been hunted and later farmed for its pork-like meat.


Photograph of sculptures along Walk 60 by Hertfordshire Walker released via Creative commons BY-NC-SA 4.0



7: Hornbeam Fruit - Hornbeams, along with oaks, are native to these woods. This carving depicts the distinctive winged fruits, having blown from the tree and settled, hoping to start its journey of life as a hornbeam.

Photograph of sculptures along Walk 60 by Hertfordshire Walker released via Creative commons BY-NC-SA 4.0


8: Peasant Woman and child - A life-size carving of a peasant woman and child foraging for wild fruits, berries and nuts.This free source of food would have been an important supplement to a peasant’s diet.

Photograph of sculptures along Walk 60 by Hertfordshire Walker released via Creative commons BY-NC-SA 4.0

Photograph of sculptures along Walk 60 by Hertfordshire Walker released via Creative commons BY-NC-SA 4.0


9: Herder - A life-size carving of a herder, looking for his cattle amongst the woodland foliage. Boundary ditches still remain in the area as evidence that the land was at one time used to graze cattle.



The nearest pubs for refreshments are The Woodman and Olive at nearby Wormley West End, and The Farmer's Boy at Brickenden.